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Being beautiful: Lessons learned from science and 'Sugar'

 

David Creel

 

My Aunt Mary, who we called "Sugar," was just the most delightful Southern lady. I can still see her delicate eyes, mauve lips, and imagine her shrugging her shoulders while saying something witty with a drawl all her own.  

 

Aunt Sugar was a regular in my first salon and in my early life. One of my most vivid memories is when she found the perfect purse, stopped immediately, and without hesitation emptied all the contents from her old one into the new one right there in the Sears department store in front of Mama, Aunt Avis, God and the amazed sales clerk. She was priceless, and I miss her. 

 

I also remember her thin, silver hair. Bless her heart, you could see right through those fine hairs to the pink of her scalp. We tried everything under the sun promising volume: mousses, gels, side bangs and even a bit of teasing to no avail. My heart breaks when I hear from all of you who are struggling with the same thinning issues.  

 

The good news is that research has come a long way since the days of my Aunt Sugar. There are myriad causes for thinning hair, some of which might be heredity, hormones, stress, illness and medication. When you first notice more hair in your brush or perhaps in your shower drain, schedule an appointment with a physician and be candid. Discuss problems that could be the culprit of hair loss such as hormonal imbalance, high blood pressure, diabetes, lupus and infection.  

 

Next, talk to your stylist for suggestions to treat your thinning hair problem. Get advice about the best shampoos, conditioners and styling products that help stimulate hair regrowth. I have heard wonderful things about Bosley and Nioxin, which are hair products created especially for, well, getting to the thick of thin hair issues.  

 

Some things you can do at home will help as well. Because the hair is made primarily of protein, a diet rich in lean meat, fish and leafy vegetables is essential. Vitamins and minerals will help nourish your hair, stimulate growth and make it shiny and strong. Also, massage your scalp a few times a week with your fingertips to stimulate the blood circulation and hair follicles. After all, who doesn't love a relaxing massage? 

 

If your hair is extremely thin, you can also try one of the camouflaging tricks I use. One is a product called Xfusion which comes in a shade to match your hair color and can be sprinkled near the scalp to instantly create the illusion of thicker, fuller hair. Unless the hair is fragile, I might also suggest a few highlights and lowlights. While it may be smoke and mirrors, it suggests volume very effectively.  

 

I can still see Aunt Sugar shrugging her shoulders while I "fixed" her thin hair. "Hun, do the best ya' can cause you ain't got much to work with," she would say. Rest assured, ladies, we have lots to work with these days.

 

Former Columbus resident David Creel owns Beautiful With David salon in Jackson and has 20 years experience in the beauty industry. Contact him at beautifulwithdavid@gmail.com.

 

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