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Market Fresh: Radishes and more

 

Anne Freeze

 

Granted, it was a tad chilly last Saturday morning, but several souls wrapped up in long sleeves and came to my cooking demo on using hothouse tomatoes at The Hitching Lot Farmers' Market. I used River Bend's tomatoes, but we are lucky enough to have Waverly Ferry Gardens growing them as well. The recipes I used can be found at hitchinglot.org. 

 

There were tender, sugary English peas available at Phil Lancaster's table. I plan to add them to potato salad, toss with scrambled eggs or just throw them into a green salad. Across the aisle, Scott Enlow of Black Creek Farm had several interesting varieties of radishes. The Big Daddy on the table was the daikon, used widely in Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese cooking. 

 

The daikon is sort of pearly white and is high in fiber, magnesium, potassium and Vitamin C. Note: it is also high in sugar. Like other radishes, it does have a peppery flavor, which I love, and is a perfect vegetable to pickle.  

 

Following are some recipes I found that are tasty and low in calories. Note that brine for the pickled radishes could also be used for carrots or any other vegetable with the same texture.  

 

Have fun with these, and I'll see you at the market. 

 

 

 

DAIKON RADISH CHIPS 

 

 

 

Daikon radish, washed peeled and sliced thinly (a mandolin works nicely) 

 

3 tablespoons olive oil (additional note below) 

 

Paprika, garlic powder or other flavoring you like.  

 

Salt and pepper 

 

 

 

  • Turn oven broiler on and mix the daikon slices with the oil and spices in a bowl. Lay the slices on a cookie sheet in a single layer. Cooking time will vary (about 5-8 minutes) so watch the chips closely once you put them in the oven. When lightly browned on one side, flip and broil on the other side. Watch even more closely. 

     

    (Source: New Hempshire Public Radio) 

     

     

     

    DAIKON RADISH SALAD 

     

     

     

    1 1/2 pounds daikon, peeled 

     

    Kosher salt 

     

    1 pound carrots, peeled 

     

    1 tablespoon grated peeled ginger 

     

    3 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar 

     

    2 teaspoons fresh lime juice 

     

    1/4 cup vegetable oil 

     

    1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 

     

    1 3/4 teaspoons white sesame seeds 

     

    1 3/4 teaspoons black sesame seeds 

     

     

     

  • Shave the daikon into ribbons with a vegetable peeler. Toss with 1/4 teaspoon salt in a colander; let drain in the sink, tossing occasionally, about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, shave the carrots into ribbons with the peeler. 

     

  • For dressing: Whisk the ginger, vinegar, lime juice and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a large bowl. Slowly whisk in the vegetable oil and sesame oil until blended. Toast sesame seeds in a skillet over medium heat, tossing occasionally, until the white seeds are golden, about 5 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon seeds to the dressing. 

     

  • Toss the daikon and carrots with the dressing and season with salt. Top with the remaining sesame seeds. 

     

    (Source: Food Network magazine) 

     

     

     

    PICKLED DAIKON AND RED RADISHES WITH GINGER 

     

     

     

    1 1/2 pounds daikon radishes, peeled 

     

    10 red radishes, trimmed and cut lengthwise into 6 wedges 

     

    1 tablespoon kosher salt 

     

    1/4 cup unseasoned rice vinegar 

     

    3 tablespoons sugar 

     

    1 tablespoon very thin matchsticks of peeled ginger 

     

     

     

  • Halve daikon lengthwise then cut crosswise into 1/4-inch slices. Transfer to a large bowl and toss with red radishes and kosher salt. Let stand at room temperature one hour, stirring occasionally. 

     

  • Drain in a colander (do not rinse) and return to bowl. 

     

  • Add vinegar, sugar and ginger, stirring until ginger has dissolved. Transfer to an airtight container and chill, covered, shaking once or twice, at least 12 more hours. 

     

    Can be kept, chilled, up to three weeks. 

     

    (Source: Gourmet magazine)

     

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