Article Comment 

Father's Day and still stumped? A few things to consider

 

Special to The Dispatch

 

 

International etiquette and modern manners expert Sharon Schweitzer of Access to Culture based in Austin, Texas, shares some tips to remember this Father's Day.  

 

  • It's beyond biological: Father figures may not just be your biological dad. Consider mentors, coaches, teachers and family members who have supported and guided your personal growth. Whether you send them a handwritten card or plan a special day to recognize these honorary fathers, let them know how much you appreciate the role they've had in your life. 

     

  • Save the date(s): Father's Day festivities can occur up to a week after the actual day it falls on. For those with several paternal figures such as grandfathers, uncles or godfathers, make time to call, visit or recognize everyone. While scheduling can be tricky, it's possible to find days and times that recognize each deserving dad. Coordinate with family members (especially siblings) as necessary. 

     

  • Offer an experience: Consider planning a special event just for Dad. A national survey of the average U.S. American's major life regrets highlighted that one of the biggest regrets is not spending more time with parents. A family barbecue, an outing to the movies, or a dinner prepared with all his favorites gives Dad the gift of precious memories with loved ones. 

     

  • Great gifting: Gifts for dads can range greatly depending on your father's interests, so have you paid attention to the movies, books and events he talks about, as well as how he spends his leisure time? 

     

    Practical gift suggestions might include business and casual clothing, restaurant gift cards to a favorite eatery or hobby accessories, or maybe a new golf club, tennis racket or fishing rod. You might want to go in on a family group gift that he will love, one that represents somewhere he'd like go, such as a fly-fishing or deep-sea trip, or concert tickets to see a favorite band.  

     

    Sharon Schweitzer, founder of Access to Culture, is an author and recognized cross-cultural corporate trainer, attorney and speaker.

     

  •  

    printer friendly version | back to top

     

     

     

     

     

    Follow Us:

    Follow Us on Facebook

    Follow Us on Twitter

    Follow Us via Email