« previous   Page 170 of 234   next »


Rob Hardy: The Lady Anatomist

Posted 6/13/2011 in Columns

In the gothic thriller "The Mysteries of Udolpho" (1794), the mysteries consist of distinguishing the real from the supernatural, and one of the scary visions seen by the heroine Emily was a body in grave clothes, being eaten by worms. She really saw it, and the author reflects, "On such an object, it will be readily believed, that no person could endure to look twice." Is it a horrific supernatural vision, or is it a mere waxwork?


Shannon Bardwell: Rules about fishing

Posted 6/13/2011 in Columns

Sam has a passion for fishing. I was thinking about that while a local official was asking me questions about where and how Sam fishes. He oughta know that I can't tell him anything. It tickles me to hear Sam on the river and a fisherman idles up beside us.


Ask Rufus: Peaceful withdrawal: 'No personal antagonism'

Posted 6/11/2011 in Columns



Generals forever: Lee Class of '46 holds 65th reunion

Posted 6/10/2011 in Community

The S.D. Lee High School Class of 1946 held its first reunion in 1976, 30 years after graduation. It was determined at that time to meet every five years, and we did, until the last one at Lake Norris in 2001.



JA of Columbus garners regional recognition

Posted 6/10/2011 in Community

Junior Auxiliary of Columbus has been recognized across the Southern region as a leader in community service.



MUW student and Columbus High student meet for cultural exchange

Posted 6/10/2011 in Community

When Sarah Harmon, a 17-year-old honor student at Columbus High School, leaves for a foreign mission trip to India and Nepal later this month, she will be equipped with some valuable information.


Table Talk serves up the buzz on bees

Posted 6/10/2011 in Entertainment

The Friends of the Columbus-Lowndes Public Library and Hitching Lot Farmers' Market present Birney Imes, avid amateur beekeeper and editor/publisher of The Commercial Dispatch, as the featured speaker at the June 15 Table Talk series.


Betty Stone: Crop circles?

Posted 6/10/2011 in Columns

Remember crop circles? Not too many years ago mysterious circles began to appear on crop lands in England, then later in the U.S. and perhaps elsewhere. I don't know; at the time I didn't give them much thought. But some people did.



Adele Elliott: Meet market

Posted 6/10/2011 in Columns

In one of my fantasies, I am a matchmaker. This is a big problem for Chris, because he is a strong proponent of minding-your-own-business. And that disparity in thinking is only one example of the vast differences between men and women.


Have couch? Will travel: A veteran traveler and friends talk CouchSurfing

Posted 6/10/2011 in Community

Stephanie Holcombe is a "yes" woman -- and proud of it. "Yes" to exploring. "Yes" to learning. "Yes" to new experiences. Her worn passport is evidence enough.

Fun on the Hill: Starkville program promotes healthy eating, living for kids

Posted 6/10/2011 in Food

Some kids have never had a fruit smoothie. It may never have occurred to them to sidestep the monotony of eating fruit by tossing it in a blender with some milk or juice and drinking it. They may have assumed the smoothies at McDonald's are just a marketing gimmick to sell another cup of fruit-flavored ice cream.


Hardy: Pox

Posted 6/7/2011 in Columns

The generations that had had smallpox vaccination scars upon their arms are dying off. That scar might have served as something like a passport to get them into a new country, or it might have allowed them to enter school.


Southside neighborhood could be added to Columbus historic district

Posted 6/7/2011 in Community

A walk through the Southside neighborhood in Columbus yields an architectural mélange, from massive antebellum mansions to quaint Victorian houses to World War II-era bungalows. Together, they may soon become the city's first residential historic district registered with the National Trust for Historic Preservation.


Adele Elliott: Passion

Posted 6/6/2011 in Columns

I have a friend who is in love with Bonsai trees. John Weathers probably has about 100 of the tiny trees scattered around his yard. Bonsais are adult trees that have been artificially dwarfed. Some can be very old; the diminutive height has nothing to do with age. Every time they produce a normal-sized leaf, it is carefully pruned. Eventually, the trees stop producing large leaves, growing only miniature ones.



Shannon Bardwell: Family reunions

Posted 6/6/2011 in Columns

At the family reunion you couldn't always tell which person was the "reunitee." Did that person look like Uncle Luther or Aunt Betty? Or did they just marry someone who looked like Uncle Luther or Aunt Betty? Whatever the case, on some level, everyone was familiar.


North Columbus business owner fashions concrete headstones

Posted 6/6/2011 in Community

Gregory Gates makes people into angels ... literally. The owner of Gifts for All in north Columbus, a "whotnots" shop near Columbus Air Force Base, makes concrete sculptures for burial markers including headstones, babies, hearts, teddy bears, benches and of course, angels.

Rufus Ward: Pirate coins of the Caribbean

Posted 6/4/2011 in Columns

The current box office hit is the movie, "Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides." As in all pirate movies, the pirates seek silver coins called "pieces of eight." A piece of eight was an actual Spanish silver coin. Several of them have been found in Columbus and along the Tombigbee.

Scout's honor: Boy Scouts offer many opportunities and activities while building future leaders

Posted 6/4/2011 in Community

They are CEOs, astronauts, politicians and engineers. They are neighbors, husbands, fathers and sons. Neil Armstrong was one. So was Gerald Ford, Donald Rumsfeld, Sam Walton, Steven Spielberg and Paul Theroux. Ordinary men living extraordinary lives. Extraordinary character forged in ordinary ways.


Duo promotes potential new state song

Posted 6/3/2011 in Entertainment

Songwriters Carolyn Sue Woods of Amory and John Riggs of Nashville, Tenn., are hoping the good people of the Magnolia State will one day soon be singing about "her fertile Delta bottom land to her coastline full of fine warm sand." The opening line of their song, "I Miss Mississippi," begins a melodic four-verse tour of the state often identified with its farming, music, magnolias and history.



North, South meet again at Table Talk

Posted 6/3/2011 in Entertainment

Elizabeth Heiskell, co-author of "Somebody Stole the Cornbread from My Dressing," is the featured speaker at the June 8 Friends of the Columbus-Lowndes Public Library and the Hitching Lot Farmers' Market Table Talk series.



« previous   Page 170 of 234   next »


Advanced Search




Follow Us:

Follow Us on Facebook

Follow Us on Twitter

Follow Us via Email