COLUMNS

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Rob Hardy: Voodoo History

Posted 4/13/2010 in Columns

It may well have happened to you.

 

Rufus Ward: The old Plymouth settlement

Posted 4/11/2010 in Columns

A reader has asked about the old Plymouth settlement on the West Bank of the Columbus Lock and Dam.

 

Jeff Wilson: Spring has arrived!

Posted 4/11/2010 in Columns

Spring has arrived right on time, as the calendar and daytime temperatures reassure us. Redbud and saucer magnolia blooms are fading and dogwoods are showing their true colors. Here are a few tips to help you and your landscape be prepared for the coming season.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Passages

Posted 4/10/2010 in Columns

Columbus is filled with pilgrims these days. They wear “comfy” shoes and cameras around their necks, and expressions of awe. These are time travelers, truly aware that they have arrived in a very special land, so distant from everyday reality.

 

 

Betty Stone: Rhyme time versus worse verse

Posted 4/10/2010 in Columns

Somewhere along the way of trying to get educated, I think some teacher told me that many, if not most, nursery rhymes of our childhood were actually thinly veiled political comments.

 

 

David Creel: Seven words worth remembering

Posted 4/10/2010 in Columns

I love these seven words from our memories that are hardly used unless you have been lucky enough to eavesdrop on a conversation between two or three Southern belles from another time. Old in wisdom, but young at heart, these women’s mothers rode in carriages along brick city streets. Listen up, because the words these matriarchs in tweed suits, pearls and arched brows drop are the ones too special to be forgotten.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Rites of spring

Posted 4/3/2010 in Columns

Finally, spring! After such a difficult winter, it seems the world is filled with promise and truly ready for rebirth.

 

 

David Creel: Carpe diem — and the foundation!

Posted 4/3/2010 in Columns

Webster’s Dictionary defines “foundation” as “an institution supported by an endowment or an undergarment worn to shape the contours of the body.” But women near and far know the foundation I speak of will be that flesh-toned cosmetic we just can’t live without. It is used to even out the complexion and, quite frankly, is where all makeup begins.

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: The silver case

Posted 4/3/2010 in Columns

During World War II my dad purchased a small silver case in India. One side has a crude etching of India-Bombay, Delhi and Calcutta, the Taj Mahal on the other side. Dad was well known for buying crafts from neighborhood children; they flocked to our door with their wares. Dad certainly would have purchased a small silver case from a street child. I wonder about that child.

 

Rufus Ward: Common flowers native to the Golden Triangle

Posted 4/3/2010 in Columns

Spring has arrived with its vivid display of color and that has brought a question. Which of our common flowers are native to this area? That is not a question I can address from the view of a botanist, but I can address it as a historian. There are a number of early accounts that describe the flora of the Golden Triangle.

 

Rob Hardy: "Culture of Plague"

Posted 4/1/2010 in Columns

The Black Death struck Europe in the 14th century, killing hundreds of millions of people.

 

 

Rob Hardy: "An Entirely Synthetic Fish"

Posted 3/30/2010 in Columns

I know little about fish or fishing, but I know fisherman like to go for rainbow trout, a good fish to have at the end of your line or to have in your frying pan.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Good ’ol boys

Posted 3/27/2010 in Columns

Once upon a time, I was a Catholic. The churches were beautiful then. They were cool and dark, filled with flickering candles, the aromas of incense and burning wax, and life-sized statues of saints. I loved those statues, and, in the spring, placed small bouquets of pink roses at their plaster feet.

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: Promise land

Posted 3/27/2010 in Columns

The garden has been tilled. We mixed in sand left over from a construction job to loosen up the prairie clay.

 

 

Rob Hardy: The big heist

Posted 3/22/2010 in Columns

The heist movie is a Hollywood standard, so when a real heist is made, it is necessary for those telling about the real heist to compare it to the movie versions. Scott Andrew Selby and Greg Campbell have repeatedly done this in “Flawless: Inside the Largest Diamond Heist in History “(Union Square Press). They repeatedly refer to the 2001 remake “Ocean’s Eleven” when telling the story of the 2003 burglary of an office called the Diamond Center in the heart of the Diamond District in Antwerp.

 

 

Rob Hardy: Mimicry and camouflage

Posted 3/22/2010 in Columns

Some animals like to sport bright colors, as if they want to be seen. Others favor drab colors, as if they want to blend in and avoid recognition. There must be advantages to both strategies. Soldiers used to sport bright red clothing in the field, and now tend to go with grey and olive blotches, if they are in forest, and beige spotty patterns if they are on sand.

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: Computer dummy

Posted 3/20/2010 in Columns

I know I’m too stupid to have a computer, and I really don’t care; but if I want to keep one finger in the world I have to have one.

 

 

David Creel: Painting the town beautiful

Posted 3/20/2010 in Columns

Whoever said making up was hard to do? It’s a cinch, especially with all of the makeup brushes available now.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Prom fight

Posted 3/20/2010 in Columns

Mississippi is in the national news, again. Sometimes it seems that we only get press for embarrassing things, like being one of the fattest states, or the least literate.

 

Rufus Ward: What is the oldest house in Columbus?

Posted 3/20/2010 in Columns

Last week Marion asked: “What is the oldest surviving house in Columbus?”

 

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