COLUMNS

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Shannon Bardwell: Liar, liar pants on fire

Posted 12/19/2009 in Columns

Isn’t it interesting that a guy can get arrested for asking for a dollar for a hamburger but any number of people can call you during the family supper hour and ask for money?

 

 

Roger Truesdale: It’s snowing in Leland

Posted 12/19/2009 in Columns

Snow storms seem to evade the Golden Triangle. I might be the cause.

 

 

Rob Hardy: Secret lives of buildings

Posted 12/15/2009 in Columns

We were touring a castle in England years ago, and came to the banqueting hall. “This hall has been remodeled many times,” the sign in the room said, “the last time in 1654.” It was a reminder of how old buildings in the Old World really are, and a cause for doubt: can it be that this room looked just the same as it did more than 300 years ago? I thought of that sign many times as I was reading “The Secret Lives of Buildings: From the Ruins of the Parthenon to the Vegas Strip in Thirteen Stories” (Metropolitan Books) by Edward Hollis.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Wish list

Posted 12/12/2009 in Columns

This is the time of year to dream of wishes fulfilled. We are making our lists for Santa, or for whomever is our personal giver of gifts. Most requests, I suppose, are reasonable. Some may ask for a gift that sparkles, or one that hums, or perhaps even one with four legs and a tail that wags. Green is always good, whether it means environmentally beneficial, or the sort of green that folds neatly into a pocket.

 

 

Betty Stone: The day the weasel went berserk

Posted 12/12/2009 in Columns

(Occasionally, a reader will ask me when we will have something else by my grandson, who is in the Peace Corps in Peru. He obliged by sending the following. Nothing in the content represents the Peace Corps or the United States government. It is simply the observation of an individual.)

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: Down at the pokey

Posted 12/12/2009 in Columns

“Hey, you got a dollar for a hamburger?” It was about lunchtime, and I was exiting my car in front of the courthouse. I smiled and said, “Yeah,” and reached back into my car at the coin keeper and gathered a handful of change. I had a hunch and intended to follow it. Now that I had his undivided attention I asked, “I think you know my husband.” He looked puzzled. “Bardwell,” I called out.

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: Grave discoveries

Posted 12/5/2009 in Columns

My little basket of cemetery tools seemed woefully inadequate as I faced a stalk as tall as me growing right out of the middle of the gravesite. I had just driven two hours to clean and decorate the grave, but for this job I would possibly need power tools.

 

 

Betty Stone: Handel’s ‘Messiah’ — a tradition is born

Posted 12/5/2009 in Columns

This year marks the 250th anniversary of Handel’s death.

 

 

Adele Elliott: A classic Christmas

Posted 12/5/2009 in Columns

I have the perfect antidote for the sort of stress that makes folks wish for a prescription of tranquilizers.

 

Wreath auction to benefit CAC and Link’d Young Professionals

Posted 11/28/2009 in Columns

With glittering baubles, bows — and even a doggie bone or two — a four-day silent auction Dec. 1-4 at the Rosenzweig Arts Center should make it a snap to deck the halls this Christmas season. Twenty decorated wreaths will go to the highest bidder, and lend support to two good causes at the same time.

 

Adele Elliott: Music notes

Posted 11/28/2009 in Columns

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas ... and, perhaps a bit too soon. Chris and I, along with our array of “usual suspects,” fought the too, too early onset of shopping, and business-type, must-attends this week. We took in two very cool concerts, both with thematic locales quite far from the North Pole.

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: Straight shootin’ Sarah

Posted 11/28/2009 in Columns

I want to tell you about my aunt, the one that always said, “Geet?” meaning, “Did you eat?” I’m only going to say that she lived in a Southern town that had an annual pilgrimage, and she lived in one of those old houses downtown and the house was said to have a ghost. My mother always said, “That Aunt Sarah is a bird,” which meant that she was eccentric or a “character.”

 

 

Roger Truesdale: Elvis and the Taliban

Posted 11/28/2009 in Columns

Before our president, the Joint Chiefs and the National Security Council make their final decision about Afghanistan, getting us deeper into our hunt for Osama Bin Laden or obliterating the Taliban, they would be well-served to buy me a plane ticket to come brief them on Elvis.

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: Southern sayings

Posted 11/23/2009 in Columns

Early on I attempted to rid myself of all things Southern except, of course, my charm. I believed the accent and expressions made me sound ignorant, and I wanted to be cosmopolitan, sophisticated and smart. Then over dinner once in the North Country suddenly, “Well, that ’bout knocked me slap dead” came flying out of my mouth.

 

 

Betty Stone: A troubled Thanksgiving

Posted 11/23/2009 in Columns

It occurs to me that, as Thanksgiving approaches this year — the second Thanksgiving of the economic plunge — some people may have a difficult time being thankful. Just recently the jobless rate reached double digits, and that does not include the underemployed. That’s still not as bad as the rate during the Great Depression, when about a fourth of the workforce were out of work. Ten percent is not as bad as 24 or 25 percent, but for the person who is unemployed, it is 100 percent.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Gratitude

Posted 11/23/2009 in Columns

Most of us are thinking about gratitude this week. And why not? Everywhere we look there are reminders of our wealth of blessings.

 

 

Anne Freeze: Recipes to remember

Posted 11/18/2009 in Columns

If you are lucky enough, your mother or grandmother had a recipe box that now lives in your own kitchen. I don’t know many cooks who actively keep one nowadays. I think the advent of instant recipes via the Internet, along with enough published cookbooks to warrant their own section in bookstores, have lessened the importance of saving passed-down recipes. And, many of these passed-down recipes have lost their relevance to today’s cook, with amounts given in pinches, or ingredients that include such items as oleo or prunes (lots of prunes in those old recipes).

 

 

Adele Elliott: Soup kitchen

Posted 11/14/2009 in Columns

Our world is so very full of need. It is overwhelming, trying to understand the vastness of poverty and suffering. Humans everywhere (and voiceless animals) are hurting. Sometimes scarcities are created by war, or natural disaster, or the unwise actions of a government. Misery may be the direct result of choices made by those most in distress. However, the causes hardly matter when the results are tragic and immense.

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: Class or crass

Posted 11/14/2009 in Columns

My mother was definitely a Southern mother, and I appreciate her more and more the older I get. I feel that I must apologize to the following generation, especially the young women, for spending more time and money trying to preserve my own youth and less acquiring the wisdom necessary to pass on to their generation. “ ... older women ... train the younger women ... ”

 

 

Rob Hardy: A hedgehog obsession

Posted 11/10/2009 in Columns

You may spout any praise of America, but you cannot conceal the fact: America has no hedgehogs. Not native ones, anyway. Oh, we have hedgehog hobbyists who enjoy having imported hedgehogs as pets, and even have them compete in the International Hedgehog Olympic Games (the Olympic Committee who runs the human version wants you to be sure they do not themselves sponsor or endorse the hedgehog version).

 

 

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