COLUMNS

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Cookie mama: From Care Bears to clone troopers, cookies rule in the Willcutt household

Posted 10/28/2009 in Columns

Grinning jack-o-lanterns, fanciful Frankensteins and dancing skeletons fill the kitchen at Lucy and Macy Willcutt’s house. But the 4- and 7-year-old sisters have nothing to fear. The Cookie Mama has just been hard at play, baking and decorating a fun-filled cast of characters ripe for gobbling up, each as sweet and tasty as the next.

 

Adele Elliott: Finally, autumn

Posted 10/24/2009 in Columns

It seemed that the season would never change. The city tried to hurry summer along by decorating downtown with our traditional fall display of scarecrows resting on bales of hay. I’m sure those straw men were grateful for the floppy fedoras protecting them from the brutal sun.

 

 

Betty Stone: A memory from MSCW

Posted 10/24/2009 in Columns

The recent tribute to Disney artist Josh Meador reminds me of an occasion which I probably ought to recount for posterity, assuming posterity is remotely interested. Change is in the air with the possibility of a new name for Mississippi University for Women, so maybe it is time to tell this bit of history — or her story, as some would say. I am not totally proud of it, however.

 

 

Rob Hardy: Pat Tillman’s true story told

Posted 10/23/2009 in Columns

Everyone who has followed current events even slightly over the past five years knows that football hero and soldier Pat Tillman was killed in Afghanistan, and that the military had trouble telling the truth about his death from rifle fire by his own platoon. Tillman had a remarkable life for one who died at age 27, and in “Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman” (Doubleday), Jon Krakauer has provided the biography that Tillman deserves, vivid and compelling.

 

 

Rob Hardy: Inside the mind of a dog

Posted 10/23/2009 in Columns

Scientifically, we might know a lot more about rats than we do about dogs. There are some experimental labs that have dogs as subjects, but lab rats get a lot of scientific attention. Dogs get a lot of domestic attention, but scientific study of dogs, and the ways they get along with humans and with other dogs, has not been a high concern.

 

 

Anne Freeze: Seafood is simple

Posted 10/21/2009 in Columns

We love seafood and could eat it every day if we had access. Access is the obstacle in a land-locked town, especially a small town. Even a moderate-sized town such as Athens, Ga., with 150,000, doesn’t have a seafood shop. There, we depended on our local organic grocery store, Earthfare, which at least had several deliveries a week of some of the basic fish, like wild-caught salmon or tuna. Plus, they also sold only dry-pack shrimp and scallops.

 

 

Roger Truesdale: For Cousin Tuffy and his sidekick, Victor

Posted 10/18/2009 in Columns

A few weeks ago, a friend of mine gave me a signed copy of Memphis historian Ron Hall’s latest book, “Sputnik, Masked Men, and Midgets: The Early Days of Memphis Wrestling.”

 

 

Roger Truesdale: For Cousin Tuffy and his sidekick, Victor

Posted 10/18/2009 in Columns

A few weeks ago, a friend of mine gave me a signed copy of Memphis historian Ron Hall’s latest book, “Sputnik, Masked Men, and Midgets: The Early Days of Memphis Wrestling.”

 

 

Adele Elliott: Ode

Posted 10/18/2009 in Columns

“Mississippi is like this, a scorched dark country where silence solidifies like clay in a kiln.” Kendall Dunkelberg These days, poems swirl around me. They are caught up in the wind, whipping around my ears and ankles. I hear them whispering in the walls and scampering, like squirrels, across the roof. Recording them, however, is as difficult as capturing clouds.

 

 

Betty Stone: From Columbus to Disney’s studios

Posted 10/10/2009 in Columns

I don’t remember when I first heard his name. I moved to Columbus when I was 9 years old, so it was well after that. I had practically cut my teeth on the films “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” “Pinocchio” and “Bambi,” but I had really given no thought to the people who animated them — literally gave them life. For me they were just characters, but as real as I was, created, I guess, by God.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Invisible in daylight

Posted 10/10/2009 in Columns

Elizabeth Smart is back in the news. You will remember her as the fragile blonde teen, stolen from her bed in 2002 and held captive for nine months. Today she is a composed and articulate 21-year-old testifying against her kidnapper.

 

 

Anne Freeze: Becoming a saucier at home

Posted 10/7/2009 in Columns

Terry and I had a sort of date night at home recently. It had been a busy week, and we got to spend all of a Saturday together, beginning at the Hitching Lot and ending with steaks grilling on the hibachi outside. I made some wonderful, crispy oven potatoes from “Cooks Illustrated” and broccoli with hollandaise sauce.

 

 

Rob Hardy: Comics and mathematics

Posted 10/6/2009 in Columns

Stand back, Spiderman. Back off, Batman. Comic books have a new hero with unexpected powers, and he isn’t even imaginary. He’s Bertrand Arthur William, the Third Earl Russell. To most Americans, Bertrand Russell is notorious for being an outspoken atheist long before the current crop of Dawkins, Hitchens, Harris and others.

 

Lasting effects: A Disney legend in animation, a Columbus son, is honored

Posted 10/3/2009 in Columns

On the gray, weathered boards of a modest, one-car garage on Columbus’ north side, Josh Meador left a telltale sign. Eighty years later, it remains: “Joshua Meador March 12, 1929,” roughly scribed in white paint on an interior wall. Facing it, from the opposite side, is an impromptu painting of mountains and clouds, in the same pigment.

 

Betty Stone: Jaunt to Memphis

Posted 10/3/2009 in Columns

Churches have gotten so enthusiastic about taking care of their elderly (not elders) that some of the “old folks” are running around with their tongues hanging out, trying to keep up with the social schedule. I was talking to someone the other day who was going to a church covered-dish supper for their “Over Fifty” group. She and her husband were taking enough food to feed at least 15. Whether they are “Fifty, Sixty, or Seventy Plus,” “Senior Class,” or “Keenagers,” they are busy.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Scholars, ever young

Posted 10/3/2009 in Columns

They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. “They,” however, are so often wrong. I truly believe we only get smarter with age. Time improves many things; wine, some cheeses, and (in my opinion) brain power.

 

 

Jeff Wilson: Fall colors

Posted 10/3/2009 in Columns

You may have noticed the color of the trees and shrubs beginning to change. It won’t be long until there are brilliant red, orange and yellow leaves blanketing the floor of the landscape. From the reds of the maple, dogwood, sweetgum and oak trees to the yellows of the ginkgo, sugar maple, poplar, elm — and even some crepe myrtles — the colors should be spectacular.

 

 

Rob Hardy: Poseidon’s Steed

Posted 9/29/2009 in Columns

Probably you have never seen a seahorse in the wild. Even Dr. Helen Scales, who is a scuba diver and marine biologist, has only seen them a few times. The first one she saw, after many dives of looking, was “like glimpsing a unicorn trotting through my garden.” But everyone knows what a seahorse looks like, a fantastic looking creature that sparks curiosity, and it is a hit at aquariums or in oceanic picture books. Scales has satisfied many facets of the curiosity about seahorses in her book “Poseidon’s Steed: The Story of Seahorses, from Myth to Reality” (Gotham Books).

 

 

Roger Truesdale: Fall — my favorite

Posted 9/28/2009 in Columns

Can you hear it? Can you smell it? Can you see it? I can — fall. My Blackberry sounded at 4:18 Tuesday afternoon. I set it several weeks ago to remind me that I could end my self-imposed summer hibernation and celebrate the autumnal equinox, the beginning of fall.

 

 

Adele Elliott: 'Oh, Lady Be Good'

Posted 9/26/2009 in Columns

In many ways, houses are like women. Their names are usually feminine, inspired by flowers, or influenced by languages more romantic than ours. Even those that bear a family surname sound more genteel when the word “manor” or “mansion” is added.

 

 

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