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Passengers cheer escape from 'horrible' cruise

 

The cruise ship Carnival Triumph is towed into Mobile Bay near Dauphin Island, Ala., Thursday. The ship, with more than 4,200 passengers and crew members, has been idled for nearly a week in the Gulf of Mexico following an engine room fire.

The cruise ship Carnival Triumph is towed into Mobile Bay near Dauphin Island, Ala., Thursday. The ship, with more than 4,200 passengers and crew members, has been idled for nearly a week in the Gulf of Mexico following an engine room fire. Photo by: AP Photo/Dave Martin

 

The Associated Press

 

MOBILE -- Passengers who finally escaped the disabled Carnival cruise ship Triumph were checking into hotels early today for a hot shower, fresh-cooked food and sleep or boarding buses for a long haul home after five numbing days at sea on a powerless ship. 

 

The vacation ship carrying some 4,200 people docked late Thursday in Mobile after a painfully slow approach that took most of the day. Passengers raucously cheered after days of what they described as overflowing toilets, food shortages and foul odors. 

 

"Sweet Home Alabama!" read one of the homemade signs passengers affixed alongside the 14-story ship as many celebrated at deck rails lining several levels of the stricken ship. The ship's horn loudly blasted several times as four tugboats pulled the crippled ship to shore at about 9:15 p.m. CST. Some gave a thumbs-up sign and flashes from cameras and cellphones lit the night. 

 

Less than four hours later, the last passenger had disembarked. 

 

Some, like 56-year-old Deborah Knight of Houston, had no interest in boarding one of about 100 buses assembled to carry passengers to hotels in New Orleans or Texas. Her husband Seth drove in from Houston and they checked into a downtown Mobile hotel. 

 

"I want a hot shower and a daggum Whataburger," said Knight, who was wearing a bathrobe over her clothes as her bags were unloaded from her husband's pickup truck. She said she was afraid to eat the food on board and had gotten sick while on the ship. 

 

Buses arrived in the pre-dawn darkness at a Hilton in New Orleans to reporters and paramedics on the scene with wheelchairs to roll in passengers who were elderly or too fatigued to walk. 

 

Many were tired and didn't want to talk. There were long lines to check into rooms. Some got emotional as they described the deplorable conditions of the ship. 

 

"It was horrible, just horrible" said Maria Hernandez, 28, of Angleton, Texas, tears welling in her eyes as she talked about waking up to smoke in her lower-level room Sunday and the days of heat and stench to follow. She was on a "girls trip" with friends. 

 

She said the group hauled mattresses to upper-level decks to escape the heat. As she pulled her luggage into the hotel, a flashlight around her neck, she managed a smile and even a giggle when asked to show her red "poo-poo bag" -- distributed by the cruise line for collecting human waste. 

 

This was only part of her journey to get home. Hernandez, like hundreds others, would get to enjoy a brief reprieve at the hotel before flying home later in the day. 

 

"I just can't wait to be home," she said. 

 

It wasn't long after the ship pulled into the Port of Mobile that passengers began streaming down the gang plank, some in wheelchairs and others pulling carry-on luggage. One man gave the thumbs up. 

 

An ambulance pulled up to a gate and pulled away, lights flashing. 

 

Carnival had said it would take up to five hours for all the 3,000 passengers to be off. It took closer to four. 

 

"All guests have now disembarked the Carnival Triumph," Carnival tweeted. 

 

For 24-year-old Brittany Ferguson of Texas, not knowing how long passengers had to endure their time aboard was the worst part. 

 

"I'm feeling awesome just to see land and buildings," said Ferguson, who was in a white robe given to her aboard to weather the cold nights. "The scariest part was just not knowing when we'd get back." 

 

As the ship pulled up, some aboard shouted, "Hello, Mobile!" Some danced in celebration on one of the balconies. "Happy V-Day" read one of the homemade signs made for the Valentine's Day arrival and another, more starkly: "The ship's afloat, so is the sewage." 

 

A few dozen relatives on the top floor of the parking deck of the terminal were waving lights at the ship as it carefully made its way alongside. Those about were screaming, whistling and taking pictures. 

 

Hundreds gawked from dockside at the arrival at the Alabama cruise terminal in Mobile, the state's only seaport, as the Triumph docked. 

 

Taxis were lined up waiting for people, and motorists on Interstate 10 stopped to watch the exodus of passengers from the cruise ship. 

 

Some still aboard chanted, "Let me off, let me off!" 

 

It took six grueling hours navigating the 30-odd-mile ship channel to dock, guided by at least four towboats. Nearly 900 feet in length, it was the largest cruise ship ever to dock at Mobile. 

 

In texts and flitting cellphone calls, the ship's passengers described miserable conditions while at sea. 

 

Buses left the terminal over several hours. Up to 100 had been reserved to carry passengers either on a seven-hour ride to the Texas cities of Galveston or Houston or a two-hour trip to New Orleans. 

 

Galveston is the home port of the ill-fated ship, which lost power in an engine-room fire Sunday some 150 miles off Mexico's Yucatan peninsula. It was the end of a cruise that wasn't anything like what a brochure might describe. 

 

Carnival CEO Gerry Cahill apologized at a news conference and later on the public address system as people were disembarking. 

 

"I appreciate the patience of our guests and their ability to cope with the situation. And I'd like to reiterate the apology I made earlier. I know the conditions on board were very poor," he said. "We pride ourselves on providing our guests with a great vacation experience, and clearly we failed in this particular case." 

 

Passenger Ferguson said crew members tried to make the situation bearable. 

 

"They did their best to keep our spirits up," she said. 

 

Joseph and Cecilia Alvarez of San Antonio said some passengers passed the time by forming a Bible study group. 

 

"It was awesome," he said. "It lifted up our souls and gave us hope that we would get back."

 

 

 

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