Tests link deadly ricin to Obama letter suspect

May 1, 2013 10:46:09 AM

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TUPELO -- When poison-laced letters were sent to President Barack Obama and two other officials, it didn't take long to track down a suspect based on a phrase in one of the letters often used by a 45-year-old Elvis impersonator named Kevin Curtis: "I am KC and I approve this message." 

 

Curtis was soon arrested at his house in north Mississippi and charged in the case. He swore he didn't do it, and told investigators that maybe a longtime foe, a martial arts instructor named James Everett Dutschke, might have something to do with the case. 

 

By the time Curtis was released on April 23, the FBI was already watching Dutschke. 

 

It was another twist in a plot Curtis' lawyer has called "diabolical." 

 

According to an FBI affidavit made public Tuesday, agents saw Dutschke the day before Curtis' release hauling items out of his former martial arts studio in Tupelo. 

 

Tests in the studio and on some of those items, including a dust mask, have tested positive for ricin, the same deadly substance found in the letters sent to Obama, U.S. Roger Wicker and Lee County, Miss., Judge Sadie Holland, the affidavit says. 

 

The affidavit also said numerous documents found in Dutschke's home had printer markings that were similar to ones on the letters and that he had used the Internet to buy castor beans, from which ricin is derived. 

 

Dutschke, 41, was arrested Saturday by FBI agents at his home in Tupelo, and is being held without bond pending a preliminary and detention hearing Thursday in U.S. District Court in Oxford. 

 

Dutschke told The Associated Press last week that he didn't send the letters. His lawyer, federal public defender George Lucas, had no comment Tuesday about the information in the affidavit. 

 

Annette Dobbs, who owns the small shopping center where the studio was located, said authorities padlocked the door to it last week. They also searched his house and vehicles. 

 

Dobbs said Tuesday that FBI agents haven't told her anything, including whether the building poses a health threat. Inside the studio is one large room with a smaller reception area and a concrete floor. Police tape covered the front and the small back door. 

 

FBI spokeswoman Deborah Madden said Tuesday that the business, Tupelo Taekwondo Plus, was sealed off after evidence that was collected tested positive for "trace levels of ricin." 

 

"The FBI is now conducting further forensic examination for the purpose of identifying trace evidence, residues and signatures of production that could provide evidence to support the investigation," she said in a news release. 

 

The FBI has not yet revealed details about how lethal the ricin was. A Senate official has said the ricin was not weaponized, meaning it wasn't in a form that could easily enter the body. If inhaled, ricin can cause respiratory failure, among other symptoms. No antidote exists. 

 

An expert at the National Bioforensics Analysis Center in Fort Detrick, Md., said the extraction process employed in this case appears to have been more involved than "merely grinding castor beans," the affidavit said.