Article Comment 

CHS' Jackson, Knox going to EMCC

 

Adam Minichino

 

When Bubba Davis has established the Columbus High School football program as a winner, he can look back on the 2009 season and thank Chris Jackson and Rickey Knox. 

 

Although the Falcons missed out on their goal this season of making the playoffs, Davis knows Jackson and Knox played integral roles in helping the Falcons turn the corner. 

 

"They were our best two senior players this year," Davis said. "They did a great job for us. They were here with us for two years and came a long way. They both got stronger and learned a lot of football. Like I told them, they were a big part of helping us to get to the point where we are ready to turn this thing around. A lot of the things they did are going to benefit the younger kids." 

 

The leadership Jackson and Knox showed this season is one reason both players will continue their football careers at the next level. The CHS standouts made it official Wednesday when they signed scholarships to play football for coach Buddy Stephens at East Mississippi Community College. 

 

Jackson, a 5-foot-9, 175-pound linebacker, led the team with 115 total tackles (61 solo). He also had two sacks, and two pass breakups.  

 

Knox, a 6-2, 270-pound right tackle, averaged out with a 90 percent blocking grade this season, which was one of the best on the team. 

 

"Chris was probably our vocal leader," Davis said. "He played real fast because he has a lot of speed. He was strong. He wasn''t big, but pound for pound he is one of the stronger kids we had.  

 

"Rickey is big and strong. He made us a little more solid up front just because of his size and power. We are just proud for them. Coach (Jim) Hamilton and coach (James) Richardson both helped them a lot." 

 

Jackson played two years on the varsity football team at Columbus High. He said associate head coach William Jones contacted his mother a couple of weeks ago and said that he would like to have him visit the campus. Jones picked Jackson up at school the next day and took him to Scooba. He gave a verbal commitment the same day. 

 

"I wasn''t expecting (the call from my mother)," Jackson said. "I didn''t know what she was calling about." 

 

Even though the call might have been unexpected, Jackson said he would sign with a school to play football. He just didn''t know where that school would be.  

 

Now that his plans are set, Jackson said he is going to make the most of the opportunity, whether it be on offense, possibly at running back, or on defense (linebacker or secondary). 

 

"I have been striving for (a scholarship for a long time), and I never had a down point or a time I didn''t think I was going to make it," Jackson said. "I always have been positive. I want to make the best out of everything." 

 

Knox said his recruiting process went just as quickly. He said he visited the Scooba campus last week and committed the same day. 

 

"The coaches are very good coaches, and you can tell they are strict and will get on you," Knox said. "They are real down to earth people. For a junior college, they have the best facilities, and they have a very good program set up down there." 

 

Knox said he will have to get stronger and work on his footwork to make the transition to EMCC. 

 

Stephens said Knox should have plenty of chances to earn playing time. The Lions graduated all five of their starting offensive linemen and two backups. He feels Knox and New Hope High''s Ryan Hollivay each will have an opportunity to be in the mix to see action on the line and Jackson will have the same chance somewhere. 

 

"Hollivay and Knox two very, very good off linemen," Stephens said. "We feel like those are diamonds in the rough. We think they''re going to be outstanding Division I linemen if they come in and do what they''re supposed to. 

 

"Chris Jackson is going to come in and be an impact guy, especially on special teams. We think with him getting after it a little he will get into the mix on the depth chart (on defense)." 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adam Minichino is the Sports Editor for The Commercial Dispatch.

 

printer friendly version | back to top

 

Reader Comments

Article Comment Rick Jones commented at 2/4/2010 5:59:00 PM:

It is so sad that Columbus High only have 2 seniors to go to the next level. The team graduated over 20 seniors and this is the best you all can do? Sad EMCC is now the new Columbus High Jr.College. Those kids deserve more. Hey guys make Bubba Gump earn all that money he is getting paid, EMCC is not the only place don't settle for just anything.

 

Article Comment Dave Miller commented at 2/4/2010 10:11:00 PM:

Rick, there is a lot more to the recruiting process than one may think. It not only takes talent, but it takes academics and a solid work ethic. There have been many, many athletes that have played at Columbus that had the talent to move on, but too many of them didn't have the grades to move on. Others don't know how to work hard. Take the time to ask a college or junior college coach about these things, and they'll tell you that they are even more important than just talent. It's one thing to throw stones from a computer monitor. It's another to actually ask relevant questions and discover what all is involved in the recruiting of athletes.

 

Article Comment No excuses! commented at 2/5/2010 9:23:00 AM:

Coaches Responsibility!

1. Instill the fundamentals of football
2. Provide disipline within the players
3. Build a respect worthy team
4. Develop good leadership/character qualities
5. Motivate players to be competitors in all aspects,on the field and off!
6. Define the importance of good work habits on the field and in life.
7. MAKE IT PLAIN AND SIMPLE THAT GOOD ACADEMIC STANDING IS THE MAIN FOCUS IN ALL SPORTS B/C WITHOUT GOOD STANDINGS AN ATHLETE IS USELESS!- withouth excelling or maintaining in academic classes, players can not contribute anything to the team, besides maybe being a waterboy! and the way things are going today, you might have to maintain a certain gpa to be the waterboy! SO GRADES SHOULD BE SECOND NATURE!

All these are coache's responsibilities. Real Coaches do not just get paid to coach football. Real Coaches take the time to make sure players understand the game of football and also the more important, game of life! Coaches are required to teach good work habbits and the importance of academics, because every athlete will not get the opportunity to play at the next level, but he/she deserves to be prepared to take the basic work ethics and academic progress to the next level that real coaches instill throughout the program.
I can witness that Coach Jones instilled all of these qualities within his ball players. If you look back you did not hear about players getting in much trouble at CHS, drive by shooting in Columbus by CHS students, or major fighting incidents involving CHS athletes all around! If you can not believe my word, thats understandable, but check it out in the records at Columbus High School. Compare the violence of now, to the violence of when Coach Jones was head football coach/ principal. He instilled the qualities within his players and it showed on the field, in the classroom, and throughout the community. He was all about making Columbus a better community through his football program.

 

Article Comment Rick Jones commented at 2/5/2010 4:15:00 PM:

Dave it is a the coaches job to make sure his players are handling their business on and off the field or court. AS a former basketball coach each year my players would get the same speech about the importance of good grades and college as the big picture. I would check progress reports and report cards. My players would even do work around the gym. I felt that it was job to instill in my players a work ethic and what was important grades. A 6A school should have more then 2 players going to EMCC where the tution is free anyway.Dave I even help got my daughter and nephrew a D1 scholarship.

 

back to top

 

 

Blogs

 

MSU Sports Blog

 

Rob Hardy on Books

 

High School Sports Blog

 

Want to blog on cdispatch.com?

 

 

 

Follow Us:

Follow Us on Facebook

Follow Us on Twitter

Follow Us via Instagram

Follow Us via Email