Our View: Reputation and credibility are on the line when stating views publicly

 

 

 

Americans watched in horror Wednesday afternoon as a mob descended on the nation's Capitol, smashing windows, assaulting Capitol police and vandalizing offices and spaces. Within hours, law enforcement cleared the Capitol grounds of the violent rioters, but not before four people were confirmed dead and multiple suspected explosive devices in the area were dispatched by the FBI. This is what domestic terrorism looks like.

 

It was the first successful assault on our nation's Capitol since British troops invaded and burned the Capitol on Aug. 24, 1814 during the War of 1812. Since then, no matter how divided and threatened our nation has been, the Capitol stood, a symbol of our nation's strength, resolve and permanence.

 

Even in the early years of the Civil War, when Washington was under the threat of invasion by Confederate forces, the Capitol was not breached. Yet on Wednesday, a photo of a rioter carrying a Confederate flag inside the Capitol was widely distributed, its bearer having achieved in a few hours what Rebel forces had been unable to do in four years of war.

 

 

What unfolded Wednesday was a heart-breaking and sobering scene for those who love our country.

 

There were, sadly, exceptions - a misguided few who celebrated the action of the rioters.

 

Most publicly prominent among them locally was Dr. Cameron Huxford, Director of the Intensive Care Unit at Oktibbeha County Hospital.

 

Responding to a tweet that read "This feels like terrorism," Huxford replied in a now-deleted tweet, "What's happened on November 3 by the stealing of the election was domestic terrorism!. Wish I was there (with) them. Freedom isn't free!"

 

Huxford's first comment is false. Claims of fraud in the election have been universally rejected for lack of evidence. No fewer than 60 courts have made that abundantly clear. So has the FBI and the attorney general of the United States. State legislatures in every state have confirmed the election results as valid.

 

It is his second comment that is most disturbing, however. As violent rioters invaded our nation's Capitol, endangering lives, destroying property and showing the world a portrait of America as a banana republic, Huxford applauded from the sidelines.

 

Americans are entitled to their views, no matter how abhorrent. All they risk is their own reputation and credibility.

 

But Huxford is an employee of a county-owned hospital.

 

In this case, as it was in July when Huxford sought to undermine public health efforts to make wearing a mask mandatory in the city of Starkville, Huxford's actions undermine the credibility of his employer and damage its reputation by what can only be described as a disgusting show of support for criminals.

 

Huxford's comments bring shame on the hospital and undermines public confidence in the hospital. OCH administration should take that very seriously.

 

 

 

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