COLUMNS

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David Creel: Lightening up the 'tween' years?

Posted 11/28/2010 in Columns

A current conversation beginning in carpool lines and spilling over into fifth-grade homework time is less about long division and more about hair color. Yes, it's true, young ladies are living in the shadows of highlighted older sisters, moms and grandmothers, so naturally the topic comes up.

 

Ask Rufus: Playing ball, 181 years ago

Posted 11/27/2010 in Columns

Ball games have been a part of Native American culture since prehistoric times. Early French missionaries among the Choctaw found them playing a form of stickball in 1729. Stickball in various forms was popular among almost all Indians in eastern North America. It was from stickball that the modern game of lacrosse evolved.

 

Shannon Bardwell: Wishing for chickens

Posted 11/22/2010 in Columns

Lenora, my Prairie neighbor, asked if I could take care of their animals while she and her family ventured north in search of respite. I quickly agreed, only to find out this meant feeding horses, cats, a dog, rabbits and chickens.

 

 

Adele Elliott: A familiar ring

Posted 11/21/2010 in Columns

Prince William of England has finally proposed to his longtime love, Kate Middleton. This is big news all over the world.

 

 

Adele Elliott: A touching tale

Posted 11/13/2010 in Columns

Most of us think we know the rules. At a very young age we learned to always say "please" and "thank you," wash our hands and share our toys. Sometimes the rules can be confusing. Our mothers taught us to be polite, but never speak to strangers.

 

 

Betty Stone: Golden windows

Posted 11/13/2010 in Columns

Do you remember the fable about the young man who had heard all his life about a magnificent house with golden windows? Finally he set out on a search to find it.

 

 

David Creel: 39 candles, and pass the moisturizer

Posted 11/13/2010 in Columns

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: We can't all be pole-dancers

Posted 11/13/2010 in Columns

Michele is an amazing mother. Her techniques are novel, and I love to eavesdrop on her parenting conversations. As the primary caregiver to her teenaged girls I know it hasn't been easy, not at all. It was after the girls were born that she went to college, got a degree and a good job to support them.

 

Ask Rufus: Stories to preserve

Posted 11/6/2010 in Columns

This Thursday marks Veterans Day. I have been blessed to have grown up as a child surrounded by relatives who were veterans of not only World War II, but also World War I and the Spanish-American War.

 

David Creel: Hair Color 10 - Class is in session

Posted 11/6/2010 in Columns

Lavish draperies, Louis XIV French settees and marble floors do nothing more than set the stage in my salon or any other. It is achieving that gorgeous blonde bob or ravishing head of red hair that is paramount.

 

 

Roger Truesdale: Another Delta star is born

Posted 11/6/2010 in Columns

Almost every small town in America has a special person who rides a bike, walks the streets, everybody knows and loves, and has at least one good story about. My old hometown, Rolling Fork, claims Calvin Dickerson as that person.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Postcards and souvenirs

Posted 11/6/2010 in Columns

Columbus has been quite a popular destination recently. We enjoyed tours, lectures, concerts and countless choices of entertainment. Some weekends Chris and I had to select carefully because we just could not do it all. Truthfully, I would like a few days off just to recuperate.

 

 

David Creel: Remembering our 'treats' every day

Posted 10/30/2010 in Columns

A friend whose mother was dying shared with me perhaps the most poignant words I have ever heard. When asked if she would like fresh roses by the window of her hospital room, my friend's 90-year-old mother, animated from within as if someone had lit a candle in her heart, said, "No, dear, I have already been given enough roses."

 

 

Betty Stone: Hallowe'en hoopla

Posted 10/30/2010 in Columns

First off, let's get something straight: I celebrate Hallowe'en, but not because I am "in league with the devil." Actually, those of us who believe in Christ are in the unique position to laugh at death, not to fear its symbols. For us, it has already been defeated.

 

 

Adele Elliott: Dialogue

Posted 10/30/2010 in Columns

I have a job answering phones at The Columbus/ Lowndes County Convention and Visitors Bureau. It's actually rather fun work, sometimes hectic, and often challenging. I make copious notes on events in the area and try to keep the details orderly and organized.

 

 

Shannon Bardwell: A tasteful bumblebee

Posted 10/26/2010 in Columns

Sam and I were on our way to the costume party; I rode beside him dressed in my bumblebee outfit. While I fought with my antennae bumping the headliner, I described costumes from a Miss Hospitality Pageant.

 

 

Rob Hardy: 'Wicked River'

Posted 10/25/2010 in Columns

If you have read Mark Twain's wonderful "Life on the Mississippi," you have seen the classic portrait of steamboating on the great river, with its sense of privilege, adventure and (essential in Twain) comedy.

 

 

Rob Hardy: 'Charlie Chan'

Posted 10/25/2010 in Columns

Sherlock Holmes, Sam Spade, Lord Peter Wimsey and Hercule Poirot are among the most famous of literary characters. They may have had their eccentricities, but being of an exotic or foreign racial extraction was not among them. It's different for another famous shamus, Charlie Chan; I know detective fiction fans might be able to think of some other non-white gumshoe, but he's the only one who comes to my mind.

 

 

Ask Rufus: The legend of Black Creek

Posted 10/23/2010 in Columns

In 1851 Joseph B. Cobb published a book titled "Mississippi Scenes." It contained one of northeast Mississippi's earliest ghost stories, "The Legend of Black Creek."

 

 

Roger Truesdale: Serious stuff this time

Posted 10/23/2010 in Columns

When I get in a car, I always buckle up -- have for a long time. In the early '80s one of my job duties was safety briefings, most of which, back in those days, amounted to nothing more than switching off the lights and switching on a projector.

 

 

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